Aegina Home & Living - Living in Aegina

 

 

 


LIVING IN AEGINA

What is it REALLY like to live in Aegina?

 

                                                           LIVING
 

LIVING                                                                                  JUNE 2009

A FEW CANINE STORIES:

PAST

When we first moved to Aegina, we were lent Billy for a couple of months, to see how a dog might fit into family life, a pilot study if you like. Billy brought the children great happiness but I found caring for him quite stressful. He would bark incessantly at any bird that happened to perch on one of our trees and for some obscure reason, it seemed to happen at night. The neighbours started to complain. He chased motorcyclists, bit my brother-in-law and one day, killed a chicken. Each morning, I would drive down to the beach and he would run behind me. We would play ‘fetch’ on the sand and then I would drive home, Billy running behind me.

One day, he sustained an injury; a perfect circle of raw pink flesh glistened beneath his white fur and it must have been sore because he wasn’t quite himself. To this day, we don’t know how it happened or what was involved. Rather than take him to a vet, I took him for a swim to his beloved sea and then, finding some old antibiotics in the bathroom cabinet, gave him a quarter of a human dose once daily for 3 days along with 250 mgs of Paracetamol. The daily swimming continued for a week and within 2 weeks, the wound was completely healed.

Unable to keep the daily beach jaunts going and exhausted from trying to keep him quiet at night, he was returned to his original owner.

PRESENT

I was completely shocked, if not angry when George asked the children if they’d like to choose a puppy from a litter of Bulgarian hunting dogs. He took them for a viewing and they opted for a doe-eyed golden male. We hoped he’d grow up to look like his father, a tall, well maintained creature of good hunting pedigree. He was to be collected two weeks later. The time arrived and I drove the excited children to the house. The puppies were nervous but cute and I suggested that since daddy was happy for them to have a dog, they should take two. So a black and white patched sister accompanied her brother in the cardboard box that was to take them to a new life. As we were about to leave, a most hideous creature sauntered past us; a short dog, a cross between an Afghan hound and a Corgi with pendulous breasts that scraped across the ground as she walked. “Who exactly is that”? I asked the dog owners.” Oh, she is the mother”! they replied.

One lunch time, we heard the most desperate expression of pain emanate from the female puppy. She had been exploring the garden, then the shed and chanced upon a carrier bag containing fishing tackle. A hook was embedded in her lower lip and the pain was excruciating. Being trained to deal with medical emergencies, I delegated our middle child to be my assistant and instructed him to place his clenched fist in the puppy’s mouth while we urgently rushed round to a friend who’d worked at the animal centre in Anitseo.

Manos tossed his long dark hair to one side and removed his hand-rolled cigarette so that he could examine the puppy .He silently left the garden and returned with pliers and a bottle of betadine. One clip and the fish-hook was removed, two dabs and the infection risk was dealt with.

The puppies are now hideously short adults with the keen intelligence of hunting dogs. We have periodic gifts of dead reptiles and a garden that is an embarrassing hole-pitted war zone but the children have more or less kept to their prescribed timetable of dog care and even Mr L has a vague kind of fondness for them.

FUTURE PETS

Thank God for ANIMAL PROTECTION!

One day, a honey coloured fluff-ball with large pale green eyes arrived outside our gate. Being a homeless puppy, she appealed to the children who immediately rescued her. She found everything interesting, particularly nocturnal insects and would yap excitedly as she chased them. At 3 am one morning, Mr. L, unable to bear his third night of insomnia, scooped her up, walked down the road with her tucked under his arm and placed her into a walled field. The following morning, the children conferred, agreed on a plan and returned with her one hour after Mr. L had left for work. I meanwhile, phoned ANIMAL PROTECTION and they agreed to take her that afternoon as a vacancy had become available.

Recently, on returning from a party, we found someone had left a box of puppies outside a neighbour’s house. Once Mr. L had gone to bed, our daughter prepared them a feast of dried bread and milk and ensured they had a supply of water.

The following day, they were found running around and we feared for their safety. We cleared all items from the shed floor and covered it with plastic sheeting and newspaper and the 4 puppies slept until ANIMAL PROTECTION arrived to collect them. (Apparently, it is easier to find puppies new homes as they are more endearing.) Once they are collected, they are transported to the ANIMAL PROTECTION centre in the mountains of Souvala where they are exercised, fed, watered and generally cared for until someone suitable is available to adopt them

ANIMAL PROTECTION offer free sterilization of dogs. They are always looking for volunteers, either in the shop in Aegina town or in the dog enclosure in the mountains.

If you are interested to learn more about them, phone 22970 27049 (the shop)

0r 6977 90 50 90 if you are interested in helping at the enclosure.    

 

Alison Lorentzos                                                          copyright 2009 



 

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